about 2faced1.com

2FACED1.com shows one persons two different faces in photos;

Persona 1:
WHAT YOU WANT TO BE
CONSIDERED AS

Persona 2:
WHAT YOU FEAR TO BE
CONSIDERED AS

This leads to a discussion about stereotypes and inner fears of getting misunderstood by the surroundings. Thoughts that every thinking modern day person does reflect upon. We're asking every day people from an innercity context where old categories as ethnicity, nationality, gender, sexuality and class are reassessed, why they choose to look like they do. We’re diggin' deep, peeling off garments, codes and attributes. We’re searching for transnational identities - is the conclusion that we choose whoever we want to be today?!

 

A 2FACED1 STATE OF MIND

A 2FACED1 is highly aware of existing stereotypes related to your own ethnicity, color, nationality, gender, sexual orientation and class. You’re trying to avoid them but sometimes also play with them to make people think twice about who you are. Two faced doesn’t mean anything negative here, it explains the double folded view you have on identity if you’re not the existing norm. Self awareness is a gift, because it also helps you to understand other peoples situations better. To be a 2FACED1 is to have the feet in different worlds, be able to move between them but feel rather at home in that space in between. You've stepped out of your comfort zone and has become one of the new identities where ol' categories are mashed up and rootlessness and non-given identity just means major possibilities.

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THE 2FACED1 NETWORK

2FACED1 is a state of mind, 2FACED1.com is a display-window for this mindset and the network of 2FACED1 includes all of you progressive non-stereotypes with a double perspective on identity .

 

2FACED1.com:

Decida -  Editor, Founder, Creative Director (Stockholm)
Oscar Stenberg - Web, Photography (Stockholm) 
Linn Marcusson - Writer, Style Assistant (Gypsie's Mega Trip) (Stockholm) 
Spoek Mathambo - (the Zombo Blog) (Johannesburg)
Alex Dabo - ( the Do The Dabo Blog) (Stockholm) 
Mira Bajagic - Event / Production (London)
Pernilla Philip -  Design (Amsterdam)

 

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2FACED1s:

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THIS SITE LET YOU SEE THE WORLD
TROUGH A 2FACED1'S PERSPECTIVE!

 
contact: info@2faced1.com

TERROR CORPS. SOUTH AFRICAN PRISON TATTOOS

Post date Thu 25 Feb 2010 2:28 PM

The men of the number cut the emblems of their allegiance into their skin. Facial tattoos are the ultimate abandonment of all hope of a life outside.

For her first solo photographic exhibition, After Life, Araminta de Clermont explores the tattoos sported by members of South Africa's notorious prison gangs. Tattoos, particularly facial, are a gesture of defiance to the prison authorities and show a prisoner's status. The pigment is created by mixing burned paper, ground-up rubber washers or brick dust with saliva. De Clermont tracked the gang members after prison and discovered their stories. The exhibition opened this week in Cape Town, but you can see some of the works here

South Africa prison gang tattoos

Bless and Kojak: The twins are 43 years old and spent 19 years in prison for stabbing a man who was 'interfering' with Kojak's girlfriend. Bless, who is more tattooed than his brother, is a member of the 28s. A spider web on his neck shows that he will wait patiently for prey, and the four stars on his shoulder are like epaulettes, indicating his high rank. Both men have fangs tattooed under their lips to signify that they will bite, and devil horns on their foreheads

South Africa prison gang tattoos

Ali is a quiet man who now works at St George's Cathedral in Cape Town as a cleaner and handyman. He was once a high-ranking gang member, as shown by crowns on the front of his shoulders. His eyelids are also tattooed

South Africa prison gang tattoos

PKD, 35, has served 15 years for five offences, including armed robbery and murder, and was released last year. He said tattooing was a release because it was a form of self-expression that was forbidden but could not be confiscated. He has 'vra my nix' ('ask me nothing' in Afrikaans) written across his forehead, and his gang number, 28, on his neck. Small dollars by the side of his mouth show the influence of Cape Town's newer street gangs

South Africa prison gang tattoos

Joseph, now a part-time odd job man, once had the rudest possible insult about someone's mother tattooed across his forehead but fearing it was too offensive he covered it with another, larger tattoo of a wine bottle pouring wine into a glass. Removing facial tattoos through the conventional means of laser treatment or skin grafts is out of the budgets of most former prisoners. Some choose to remove the tattoos with nail clippers or by burning them off, which leaves terrible scarring

South Africa prison gang tattoos

Omar is well over 6ft tall and covered in scores of small tattoos. He was jailed for 15 years for stabbing a man who had hit him over the head with a rock. He was a 'king' in prison, a high status member of the 28s gang - the tattoo of a hand on his neck is their salute. The scorpion on his upper arm shows his membership of the Cape Town Scorpions gang. Omar was released from prison in 2004 and now sleeps rough and sells wine to his fellow street people

South Africa prison gang tattoos

Johannis is an old school Number gang member and his tattoos show the strong Zulu influence in 'Number lore'. He lost his legs after leaving prison when he was run over by a truck. He makes his money begging and is often attended by two other former gang members who push him where he wants to go

 

Mon 1 Nov 2010 8:51 AM
Anonymous
Very Goood
Thu 16 Sep 2010 1:59 PM
Kevin
@ Aslam - Waddy Jones' father was murdered in a carjacking, I think this shows he was subject to violence. He also spend a short time in prison for drugs. I know this isn't the same as these men who are hopeless but remember that these men are a small piece of the picture. Tatua is an art form and Waddys are hand poked to preserve this art - the back piece he has proves his dedication to this art form. Yes, he uses it to project an image, but that image is ZEF, he's just an ordinary, lower class Afrikaan and none of his tattoos infringe upon any gangs imagery, just a general style.
Sat 27 Feb 2010 4:08 PM
ODD POINT. THE ABOVE PIECE AND EXHIBITION REALLY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THAT...YOU THINK THAT COMMODIFICATION WILL GO FURTHER...I GUESS IT HAS ALL OVER THE WORLD WITH TRADTIONAL PRISON GANG TATTOOS/MOTIFS/ICONS MOVING INTO POPULAR CULTURE...AT THE SAME TIME EVERYONE IS SA SAYS *HOLA 7*...LANGUAGE ALSO DERIVED FROM PRISON GANGS...QUITE A NATURAL MOVE AS THOSE PRISONERS GET OUT AND BECOME THE INFORMED *NDODAS*
Fri 26 Feb 2010 8:34 PM
Aslam
The tjappies are of course now just a commodity, something that performers like Waddy Jones can appropriate at will, without having been subjected to the violence these people are.

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